Canyon Matka

Top Attractions

Top Attractions

Canyon Matka

Wander just a few miles out of the urban jungle, and you find yourself at the very gate to the Skopje's countryside. The first stop, surprisingly close to the city of Skopje is the nature paradise known as Canyon Matka.

History and more…

Wander just a few miles out of the urban jungle, and you find yourself at the very gate to the Skopje’s countryside. The first stop, surprisingly close to the city of Skopje is the nature paradise known as Canyon Matka. An outdoor attraction covering 5000 hectares of breathtaking scenery, it is easily one of the most captivating places Skopje and Macedonia has to offer.

By its morphogenetic characteristic, it is a breakthrough gorge. The canyon is vertically cut into the massive of Suva Mountain. The different formations in the canyon like the karrens, flutes, valleys, cracks, crevices and caves have been formed by a long term impact of the mountain rivers, as well as by great temperature oscillations. In the surroundings of the Matka Canyon one can find dozens of caves, the most beautiful ones being Vrelo, Krshtalna and Ubava. The caves are filled with numerous stalagmites, stalactites and dripstone pillars and some of them are illuminated. The diversity of dripstone adornments has been captured by a well deployed illumination. Visiting tours are organized by an official guide.

Matka Canyon is the most important alpine climbing center in Skopje and North Macedonia. The major climbing season in Matka begins in spring, round the Easter holidays when visitors come from countries from all over Europe. The season continues throughout summer and fall until the end of November.

Did You Know?

Fact #1

After Macedonia was liberated from the Turks’ sway in the early 20th century, it became a Republic of the Yugoslav Federation with Skopje as its capital.

Fact #2

The city had changed its name four times throughout the centuries, being called Skupi (13 year B.C), Justinijana Prima (5th, 6th century), Skopje (7th century) and Ushkup (14th century).

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